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23 Dic 2016 

Make the most of the Fall with Seasonal Decorating, Home Improvement Ideas and Real Estate Advice from Scripps Networks’ Home Websites

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Since the fall season is catch-up look these up time for all things inside, outside

and around your home, Scripps Networks' home sites have partnered to

create an ultimate destination for tips and projects for the season,

including weekend projects, buying and selling insider advice,

budget-friendly decorating ideas, autumn gardening -- even ways to create

your own entertainment room to enjoy the football season!

Hundreds of handy activities, including articles and videos, are housed

on the four home-related websites for Scripps Networks -- HGTV.com,

DIYnetwork.com,

FrontDoor.com

and HGTVPro.com.

Visit these sites for this fall's guide for the perfect autumn abode.

Here's a highlight of what the sites have to offer:

HGTV.com's Weekend Projects

Browse dozens of photos and videos of fun and fabulous fall step-by-step

projects for $100 or less, from installing headboards and faux crown

molding to ceiling medallions and radiator covers.

Outdoor Retreats

DIYNetwork.com shares groundbreaking

ideas and look at more info how-to steps for creating backyard escapes and front yard

retreats for you to enjoy this fall, including all the latest in outdoor

lighting, backyard entertaining and deck building.



Budget-Savvy Bathrooms

This fall, find great buys for your bathroom on a small budget. Visit

HGTV.com's Smart

Chic Bathrooms feature for how-to's, bathroom makeover photos,

budget-friendly items and a cool quiz to test your bargain buying skills.

Winterize your home

Stop the leaks and lower your energy bill with sealing and insulation

techniques from HGTVPro.

Also, get great tips for preparing your lawn for the coming winter and

inspecting your fireplace from FrontDoor.com.

Buying or selling?

By the holiday season, real estate deals disappear -- as do interested

buyers. Make your move now, with FrontDoor.com's best buying

and selling tips for fall.

Paint & Color Guides

Learn how to paint like a pro, including the hottest color combos for

your bathroom, bedroom and kitchen, as well as DIYNetwork.com's tips

and techniques on how to add character to your walls.

Fall Gardening

For lots of great tips on how to maintain your fleur for the fall, check

out HGTV.com's Fall

Gardening Guide. Watch short videos on what to plant, how to plant

it and steps for proper care of your garden.



About Scripps Networks Digital

Scripps Networks Digital is a diversified multi-platform programmer that

delights millions daily with award-winning content in the home, food and

living categories. SN Digital's websites -- HGTV.com,

FoodNetwork.com, DIYnetwork.com,

GACTV.com, Food.com, HGTVPro.com,

FrontDoor.com,

Food2.com; and the newest CookingChannelTV.com -- are powered by engaging

content, interactive tools and social spaces that take fans of Scripps

Networks cable brands further into the story and offer online users

information and inspiration to fuel their passions. SN Digital also

distributes content to mobile and online partners, providing lifestyle

solutions virtually anywhere, anytime.
22 Dic 2016 

How to stay on top of a renovation project

If you're planning on tackling a major renovation project in the near future, here are some tips to make sure you're getting what you want.



Planning Ahead

Excited to get their new kitchen or bathroom, many homeowners rush in without proper planning. Failing to take care of the nitty-gritty details up front can turn your project into a renovation disaster, taking much more time and costing much more money than you expected. 

With a home renovation ideas on a budget tool like Autodesk's Homestyler you can build a 3D model of your home and test out various renovation ideas, giving you a good idea of what the project will look like before you start tearing down walls. By visualizing your project, you'll be able to make a list of everything you want to change, which will help keep you on budget and on schedule down house renovation costs the road.

By visualizing your project, you'll be able to make a list of everything you want to change.

To help with the planning process, you might also consider hiring an architect. An architect can help you work through your ideas and put together a plan that fits your budget, and can also make sure the contractor executes the plan properly.  



Staying on Budget

Sometimes cost increases are out of your control. If a contractor finds that the wiring in the kitchen isn't up to code and needs to be replaced, that's just an extra cost that you'll have to accept. But often, cost increases are the result of homeowners changing their minds mid-project.

Over the course of the project, you'll have to make dozens of decisions -- from small items like picking out door knobs, to bigger costs like flooring material. Your builder might offer you slightly more expensive upgrades, which, while tempting, can quickly start to add up. Get a price list for materials in advance, figure out what you can afford and stick to it. To help you stay on top of things, use an app like HomeZada, which allows you to log project costs and work out a budget for a project in advance.  

Staying on Schedule

There are some things you can do to make sure the project gets done quickly. First, make sure the materials you want are actually available. You may have your heart set on a particular bathroom tile, but if there's a six-week backorder, it's only going to cause massive delays and possibly added costs. So talk with your builder in advance to make sure all the materials will be there from day one.

Next, you'll want to figure out your permit situation well in advance. Rather than getting caught up during construction in red tape that can drag on for weeks, have all the necessary paperwork filled out before you start the project. Ask your contractor or architect what sort of permits they expect to need on the project and what you need to do to get them sorted out.

Finally, make sure the project manager or architect is going to be onsite every day. Many will show up at the beginning of a project, delegate the work and then not show up until the final walkthrough. This could be a recipe for disaster, so make sure you know who is calling the shots onsite and insist that they be there every day or, at least, on a very regular schedule. If you're living elsewhere during the remodeling job, you'll also want to make sure to visit very frequently, if not every day. That way, when issues arise, they can get sorted out quickly.

Improving Communication

Once a project is in full swing, maintaining good communication between a homeowner and the builder is key. Fortunately, there are some great online tools for renovation projects that can keep you and your contractor or architect on the same page. PlanGrid and OnSite PlanRoom are project management systems for mobile devices that allow you to view and modify blueprints, add comments or request changes. When a project leader makes a change to the plans or someone home renovation contractors runs into a problem, you get an update, keeping you on top of the project from wherever you are.
21 Dic 2016 

Bracing For Fire | The Huffington Post

2016-07-18-1468858770-8025759-lasconchasnasa.jpg

A photo from space of the Las Conchas fire in the Jemez mountains near Los Alamos, N.M. just after its start at 1:30 p.m. on June 26, 2011. On the first day, driven by strong and unpredictable winds, the fire burned 43,000 acres--a rate of about an acre per second. By the time the fire was controlled, it had burned more than 150,000 acres. (Photo courtesy of NASA.)

How Computer Modeling Might Help Us Better Understand--and Better Manage--Wildfires

This summer, throughout the West, higher temperatures and decreased precipitation brought on by climate change have ramped up the frequency of wildfires -- big, catastrophic fires -- while a century of fire suppression feeds the flames with a thick tangle of fuel in our overgrown forests.

We can't stop all fires -- and we shouldn't. Healthy ecosystems depend on them. But understanding what drives big fires and predicting their behavior helps the fire community prepare for the next blaze through appropriate land management, emergency plans and firefighting strategies. Beyond those benefits, a deeper understanding of wildfires prompts important insights into tactics for using prescribed fire as well as insight into larger regional environmental issues, including how fires change river flows and the availability of water for drinking, agriculture and energy production.

For scientists studying wildfire, the challenge is predicting the seemingly unpredictable. A wide range of conditions -- temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction, larger weather patterns, available fuel, fuel conditions and terrain --influence the behavior of fire. Figuring out details such as the movement of hot gasses coming off a raging forest fire or the combination of convective and radiative heat transfer that ignite unburned fuels, for example, seems impossible at first. There's so much to consider, from how the fire front interacts with the atmosphere that drives it forward to the feedbacks of the fuel's structure on the fire and winds to the impacts of the topography and regional meteorology.

Fortunately, Los Alamos National Laboratory is well suited to address this kind of multidisciplinary, ultimately physics-based problem -- and the lab has a stake in wildfire prediction and management. As the Cerro Grande and Las Conchas fires demonstrated, the laboratory and neighboring communities are equally vulnerable to runaway conflagrations on our doorstep. Furthermore, Los Alamos' mission includes addressing energy security and national security, both of which can be affected by wildfires.



Modeling wildfires exploits the lab's unique capabilities in physics, computational modeling and high-performance computing. For decades the lab has built computer models of complex systems that move and change through time. That work includes hot gasses -- fire -- and the atmosphere. The laboratory's supercomputers make it possible.

When a team of atmospheric scientists, computational physicists and mathematicians in the laboratory's Earth and Environmental Sciences division, collaborating with the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station and Southern Research Station, set out to simulate the interacting processes that make up a wildfire as a basis for predicting its behavior, they leveraged a wealth of expertise and experience that had been developed partially through the laboratory's weapons program.

A research effort initiated by Laboratory Fellow Francis Harlow, a pioneer in computational fluid dynamics, and Andrew White, a visionary figure in the national high-performance computing community, led to the development of FIRETEC. It was the first wildfire model to simulate the interaction among many of the physical processes that determine the continuously shifting dance between fire and its surroundings. FIRETEC, which is now developed in collaboration with U.S. Forest Service, simulates three-dimensional interactions among fire, fuel and the environment at landscape scales. By coupling FIRETEC with an atmospheric-dynamics model called HIGRAD and using real-world data, the team can represent the interaction between fire and atmosphere and the way fire adjusts to terrain, vegetation, fuel and the dynamics of fire itself.

FIRETEC presents a new way of studying fire and learning how to better manage and cope with it. The model provides additional scientific input for decisions by policymakers working in land management, water resources and energy. The team hopes it will eventually assist fire and fuel management operations. Currently the team is partnering with the Rocky fuel management system software Mountain Research Station to study the combined influence of wind and slope on heat exposure in firefighter safety zones, with the Air Force Wildland Fire Center to study the efficiency of various prescribed fire tactics and with INRA of France and the Canadian Forest Service to study the effects of fuel breaks for fire management.

But there's more research to be done to further improve wildfire modeling for practical use in the field during a fire. FIRETEC's complexity and the massive amounts of data involved require enormous high-performance computers such as those available at Los Alamos to perform simulations. The laboratory-led team is now working with the Forest Service to apply what it learns from FIRETEC to assist in developing and refining less detailed but faster-running tools that incident fire commanders could run on their laptops to predict fire behavior over the next few hours. This is a short enough time frame to deploy firefighters in anticipation of the fire's next move or help keep firefighters out of harm's way. This faster-running tool could also benefit decision-support tools such as Simtable, which is currently used in the laboratory's Emergency Operations Center.

On another front, as part of a larger Los Alamos stand alone fuel management system study on the impact of climate-driven changes on watersheds, laboratory researchers are working toward using FIRETEC to potentially spin off simplified models. One model can explore, for example, how the aftermath of a catastrophic fire in the Colorado River system might alter flows in the San Juan River. That's important locally because the San Juan supplies drinking water to Santa Fe and cools the Four Corners Generating Station, a major regional energy source. How will climate-driven changes to vegetation alter the pattern of fires and the severity of the effects in that watershed? What can be done to minimize those impacts? Research underway now should answer these questions.

Providing those answers is an appropriate endeavor for Los Alamos for several reasons. While the Los Alamos community has had more than its fair share of encounters with wildfire, the research is more than personal: it fits the laboratory's mission to enhance energy security and national security. Additionally, the required expertise in the combination of multi-phase fluid dynamics, heat transfer, combustion, computational modeling and computer science are optimally aligned with many of the laboratory's other mission areas. "Science serving society" is a catchy phrase, but in the case of wildfire modeling at Los Alamos, it couldn't be more apt.

Rod Linn is a senior scientist in the Computational Earth Science group at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he studies and models a wide range of atmospheric phenomenon using computational physics. Linn has led much of the development and application of the FIRETEC computer program for predicting wildfire behavior, but the breadth of work using this tool is accomplished through a broad set of Los Alamos investigators as well as domestic and international collaborators.

More about how Los Alamos National Laboratory prepares for wildfires:

20 Dic 2016 

France planning to eliminate diesel-powered cars

France may be done with diesel. Prime Minister Manuel Valls has announced his intention to eliminate diesel-powered passenger cars from his country's roads, Reuters reports.



It's part of a broader environmental effort that will include the launch next year of a pollution rating system for automobiles, which will facilitate the banning of the dirtiest browse around this web-site cars from urban centers.

Approximately 80 this content percent of cars in France today run on diesel, thanks largely to a tax system that makes the fuel about 15 percent cheaper than gasoline. Most European countries have similar policies that were put into effect because diesel cars are typically more efficient than gas-powered ones, but it comes at the expense of higher smog-producing particulates and carbon emissions per gallon burned, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. As the focus has shifted from reducing oil dependence to cleaning up the air, and with gasoline-powered cars closing the efficiency gap with diesel in recent years, officials have started to rethink this approach.

"In France, we have long favored the diesel engine. This was a mistake, and we will progressively undo that, intelligently and pragmatically," Valls said.



Next year the tax on diesel will rise two cents, which should reduce consumption will taking in over a billion dollars in revenue. Meanwhile, drivers who trade their diesel cars for electric ones could get up to $13,500 in incentives to make the switch.
15 Dic 2016 

Home Improvement (TV Series 1991–1999)



Won

1

Golden Globe.

Another

39 wins & 62 nominations.

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Frank Lambert is a construction worker and a single father of 3 kids: J.T., Alicia "Al", and Brendan. Carol Foster, a beautician, also has 3 children: Dana, Karen, and Mark. After Frank and... See full summary »

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Storyline

Light television comedy about family man Tim Taylor. The show's humor often revolves around cars, toys, tools, hardware shops, garages, fix-it-up projects, and similar themes. Written by

Tad Dibbern <[email protected]>

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Details

Release Date: 17 September 1991 (USA)

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Also Known As: Mejorando la casa

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Company Credits

Technical Specs

Runtime:

22 min

(204 episodes)

Aspect Ratio: 1.33 : 1

See full technical specs »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The label "WLS" was frequently used to cover up real corporate logos. These are the initials of the series' original property master, Warren Schaffer. WLS are the call letters of the ABC Owned and Operated affiliate station in Chicago, Illinois. WLS are also the call letters of 2 radio station in Chicago owned by Citadel (who bought ABC's radio division). See more »

Goofs

Al's girlfriend, Ilene is first introduced as Ilene Markum. But in 'Dream On' the credits says that her character is Ilene Martin. See more »

Quotes

[repeated line]

Tim:

We'll be right back after a word from Binford Tools.

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Crazy Credits

Most episodes featured outtakes from either Tool Time or the show itself as a backdrop home remodeling cost estimate to the closing credits. See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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(Spoiler Alert!) »

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